Minimum Wage Laws

Wages and Hours – U.S. Department of Labor – www.dol.gov

The act is administered by the Wage and Hour Division. It requires employers to pay covered employees who are not otherwise exempt at least the federal minimum wage and overtime pay of one-and-one-half-times the regular rate of pay. For nonagricultural operations, it restricts the hours that children under age 16 can work and forbids the employment of children under age 18 in certain jobs deemed too dangerous. For agricultural operations, it prohibits the employment of children under age 16 during school hours and in certain jobs deemed too dangerous.

Every employer of employees subject to the Fair Labor Standards Act’s minimum wage provisions must post, and keep posted, a notice explaining the Act in a conspicuous place in all of their establishments so as to permit employees to readily read it. The content of the notice is prescribed by the Wage and Hour Division of the Department of Labor. This approved copy of the minimum wage poster has been made available for informational purposes or for employers to use as posters.

Minimum Wage Laws in the following States – January 1, 2016

If an employee is covered by federal and Colorado state minimum wage laws, then the employer must pay the higher minimum wage. Federal minimum wage is currently $7.25 per hour, which is lower than the Colorado state minimum wage of $8.31. Therefore, based upon current information, covered employers in Colorado will have to pay their employees the higher value of $8.31 per hour under Colorado law beginning January 1, 2016.

Minimum Wages for Tipped Employees in the following States – January 1, 2016

If an employee is covered by federal and Colorado state minimum wage laws, then the employer must pay the higher minimum wage for tipped employees. Federal tipped minimum wage is currently $2.13 per hour, which is lower than the Colorado tipped minimum wage of $5.29 per hour. Therefore, based upon current information, covered employers in Colorado will have to pay their tipped employees the higher value of $5.29 per hour under Colorado law beginning January 1, 2016.

If an employee’s tips combined with the employer’s cash wage of at least $5.29 per hour do not equal the minimum hourly wage, the employer must make up the difference in cash wages.

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